I hear and I forget 
I see and I remember
, I do and I understand…

If we want to proceed further we need to understand each other. To understand one another we definitely need to improve our communication, and surely enough to improve communication we need to train great speakers!
This is indeed true in all area of daily life but it is particularly important in science, where a major part of what we can achieve is based on the way we interact with other scientists.

Indelibly giving good talks is a prerequisite for any scientist. The better the talk you give the more invitation you’ll get, the higher the stand of your projects. Public speaking is HARD! The good news is, that there is a way to make it easier.The bad news is: there is only ONE way, and that is: practice, practice, practice!

In my opinion the difference between an interesting presentation, a good presentation and a great presentation, (independently on the results you are presenting) is that in the first case you get people listening because they are interested in what you are presenting, in the second case your audience begins reading email (at conferences) or thinking about something else after 10 minutes and in the third you get their complete awareness until the end. After 1 min talk the person should say “I want to hear more”, after 5 min “I want to read about your work”, after 15 min “I wish I was doing what you are doing”.

It did help me to study good speakers, what they do, why they are successful, look at their presentations (at conferences or videos) and try to reproduce them. TED is a very good platform if you are looking out for inspiration. As a suggestion I always tell my students, they should tell their audience a story: “He who owns the narrative rules the world” (D. Kruger)

I have been watching TED talks since a while now and I can define myself as “TED addicted”. TED speakers are among the best I have ever heard: not only I always learn something new but also I find many new strategies how to communicate effectively. Watching TED has become for me now an healthy habit.

The main challenge with habits is that they need to be trained.
Within the Irene Joliot-Curie Program we are beginning with it through a rather informal evening: we will watch together some of the best TED talk and take our time to discuss about them and bring home a couple of lessons on how to improve our own way of presenting our stories.

For this first TDD (TED-Driven-Dinner) I have chosen those ones, who have made me first realized how much I needed to improve my own storytelling. I will post the program on the weekend … if you want to hear sooner and more about it then join us on Thursday :-)

Publiziert am: 29. April 2015. Abgelegt unter Allgemein

Programme Winter Term 2014 / 2015

 

Check out our new programme for Winter Term 2014 / 15.
More details about the events are available under "anouncements".

Flyer_Wintersemester_2014_15

Please note: In the context of „Studentinnen planen KARRIERE“ the JGU´s Office of Gender Affairs and Equal Opportunity offers an application training on 17 an 18 April 2015, each day from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Publiziert am: 11. November 2014. Abgelegt unter Allgemein

“…it just means you´ve got excited about something.”

Beth Reeks was named on a list of the 16 most influential teenagers in the world by Time magazine in 2013. She is particularly known as author of the novels “The Kissing Booth” and “Rolling dice”, but despite her literary success, she is currently studying for a Physics degree at Exeter University and is predominantly interested in astrophysics and particle physics.

In this interview with Henry Lau from physics.org she talks about women and girls in physics and the impact of role models and social media.

 

Keynote Marianne Heiß – Yes she can

On June 12 Marianne Heiß, BBDO´s European Finance Director, held a keynote about "Yes she can - female leadership" in Mainz. She kindly made the presentation slides of her interesting and inspiring speech available:

slides_heiss_front

 

Please find a collection of impressions of the event and some videos of other talks above.

 

Interview’s panic!

I am surely not an expert in giving courses about how to give the perfect interview but, since our Kick-Off meeting, I have realized that this is a hot topic among young scientists so let me share with you what my own experience is (on both sides of the table).
Normally an interview consists of two parts: your presentation and the interview itself.

Let me begin with the first part (and we will reserve a specific post for the second).

In the first part you are asked to give a small presentation about your research and achievements.
Depending on the position you are applying for, it might be good to also add some perspective or future projects you'd like to pursue in case you get the position.

Indelibly giving good talks is a prerequisite for any scientist. The better the talk you give the more invitation you'll get, the higher the stand of your projects (and of course of your CV).
Public speaking is HARD! The good news is, that there is a way to make it easier.
The bad news is: there is only ONE way, and that is: practice, practice, practice!

In my opinion the difference between an interesting presentation, a good presentation and a great presentation, (independently on the results you are presenting) is that in the first case you get people listening because they are interested in what you are presenting, in the second case your audience begins reading email (at conferences) or thinking about something else after 10 minutes and in the third you get their complete awareness until the end. After 1 min talk the person should say “I want to hear more”, after 5 min “I want to read about your work”, after 15 min “I wish I was doing what you are doing".

It did help me to study good speakers, what they do, why they are successful, look at their presentations
(at conferences or videos) and try to reproduce them. TED is a very good platform if you are looking out for
inspiration.

As a suggestion I always tell my students, they should tell their audience a story: "He who owns the
narrative rules the world" (D. Kruger)
I found a very nice presentation given at TED: it explains the idea that giving a talk is like making a journey

 

There are zillions of good links in the net (at the end of this contribution I pick only a couple of them) and you
can also find many opportunities to participate in seminars or courses, during which you are thaught by expert, how to do it best.

If you want to read more about this subject but you are flooded with the answers google might give a reply,
begin by checking these out ...